Have you ever heard of the Rattlesnake Master? Have you seen Slender Mountain Mint? You know Black-Eyed Susan, but did you know Sweet Black-Eyed Susan? These local native plant seeds, and more, are available now at the Seed Library.

Why should you grow native plants? Native plants have adapted to the local climate and soil conditions where they naturally occur. They provide nectar, pollen, and seeds that serve as food for native butterflies, insects, birds and other animals. Their roots reach deep into the soil to help prevent erosion. They are also naturally beautiful.

The Seed Library committee harvested 24 different kinds of seeds from Dr. Helen Stuessys’ tall grass prairie. Dr. Stuessy is a member of HC-RIPS (Henry County – Removes Invasive Plant Species), an organization dedicated to removing invasive plants found in Henry County. The committee sorted the seeds, put them into envelopes and labeled them. You can find the seeds in the cabinet in front of the Indiana Room. The native seeds are in the bottom drawer. There are pictures of each kind of plant on top of the cabinet.

These seeds are ready to be planted in late fall and early winter. One important thing to note is that temperate wildflowers need to have a cold, moist period of time that mimics how the seeds germinate naturally. Indiana Native Plant Society lists several methods on their webpage on how you can sow seeds outdoors and indoors to have them ready for next spring planting season

Kathie Ward, Indiana genealogy and local history librarian and founding member of the Seed Library, says her favorite is blue indigo. Krystal Stanich, committee member, likes the ironweed. All of these seeds will be available at the Seed Library table anytime the library is open. Please be sure to sign up for Seed Library membership when you pick up your seeds.

If you have questions about native plants or other questions about the Seed Library, please contact Kathie Ward at kathiew@nchcpl.org or at 765-521-3581 x1368.