Family R.E.C Time

By nchcpl_admin,

Weekly routines are important for preschool-aged families, which is why we developed Family R.E.C. Time. Whenever there is a break in our storytime cycle, it’s time for R.E.C., which stands for Reading-Eating-Creating. This self-guided storytime is available in the Children’s Library story room from 10 am to noon on designated days.

Our team provides a specific theme and selects books and activities related to the theme. Past themes have included dogs, forts, the beach, and Dr. Seuss. We will have a light snack for your child along with craft supplies and instructions so that you and your child can create something related to the theme.

Kids love the opportunity to read with caregivers and even play make-believe as a storyteller. One mother pointed out that she loves the crafts offered, knowing that her kids are free to let their creative juices flow without worrying about making a mess.

Check out the Events link to find out the date for the next R.E.C. time.

TTW Pictures

By nchcpl_admin,

This year’s Teen Tech Week was a success. I’d like to say thank you to all of the teens who showed up for our TTW programs as

Geek Squad 2

well as the wonderful Geek Squad who came out and made learning html actually kind of…fun?!!

Geek Squad 3

See you at next year’s TTW!

[youtube id=”5SP3K4ylDL0″]

 

March – New CDs

By nchcpl_admin,

COUNTRY - Chris Janson - Buy Me a Boat COUNTRY - Easton Corbin - About to Get Real COUNTRY - Hunter Hayes - The 21 Project COUNTRY - Michael Ray POP - Jess Glynne - I Cry When I Laugh RHYTHM,BLUES - Chris Brown X Tyga - Fan of the Album RHYTHM,BLUES - The Weekend - Beauty Behind the Madness ROCK - Blur - The Magic Whip ROCK - Boots - Aquaria ROCK - Fall Out Boy - American Psycho Again ROCK - Hollywood Vampires ROCK - Keith RIchards - Crosseyed Heart

Geek Squad @ the Library!

By nchcpl_admin,

This Friday (aka TOMORROW), we will be hosting Best Buy’s Geek Squad in the computer training lab at 4pm. The Geek Squad is performing a coding workshop for Teen Tech Week. This is a BIG DEAL because we are one of only TWO libraries in the ENTIRE STATE of Indiana that are doing this workshop (and one of twenty-seven in the COUNTRY): click for the full list. If you missed it, the Courier Times also wrote an article about it in today’s paper.

pizza

As a last huzzah to Teen Tech Week, we will follow the workshop with a Papa John’s Pizza Party in the TeenScape for the teens in grades 7-12 who attend the workshop or today’s Lego Stop Motion program. No registration required. Bring your friends, your cousins, and that kid who always has stuff falling out his locker. Basically, if you know someone in grades 7-12 (and you can tolerate their presence for two hours)…bring them.  See you there!

Krystal

The Last Unicorn

By nchcpl_admin,

One of the first books I remember reading is a collection of fairy tales. Even before I could read, I remember staring at the illustrations and repeating to myself the tales I’d heard my mother read to me. The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle is a tale in the vein of a fairy tale, with magical creatures, wizards, spells, a prince, and an evil king.

In a forest, an immortal unicorn lives peacefully, protecting the wood and its inhabitants. One day, however, she overhears the story of all the other unicorns vanishing from the world—she is the last. Her journey to discover what has happened to her fellow creatures takes her into danger, and into the company of an inept wizard and a rough kitchen servant. Can this trio defeat King Haggard, whose search for happiness has made him utterly uncaring about anyone else?

The story is written in a lyrical prose, and filled with quips that are like riddles (and lots of riddles as well). The style of writing creates a thoughtful, wonder-filled, and sometimes melancholy feel to the tale. The book is illustrated by black and white line drawings that reinforce this atmosphere. In 2011, a graphic novel adaption was released, full of luminous color illustrations that skillfully capture the same magical feel of the novel. If you are in the mood for a thoughtful fairy tale, check out The Last Unicorn in book or graphic novel format.

Review by staff member Josephine K.

Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson

By nchcpl_admin,

“Before Peter Pan belonged to Wendy, he belonged to the girl with the crow feather in her hair…

Fifteen-year-old Tiger Lily doesn’t believe in love stories or happy endings. Then she meets the alluring teenage Peter Pan in the forbidden woods of Neverland and immediately falls under his spell.

Peter is unlike anyone she’s ever known. Impetuous and brave, he both scares and enthralls her. As the leader of the Lost Boys, the most fearsome of Neverland’s inhabitants, Peter is an unthinkable match for Tiger Lily. Soon, she is risking everything—her family, her future—to be with him. When she is faced with marriage to a terrible man in her own tribe, she must choose between the life she’s always known and running away to an uncertain future with Peter.

With enemies threatening to tear them apart, the lovers seem doomed. But it’s the arrival of Wendy Darling, an English girl who’s everything Tiger Lily is not, that leads Tiger Lily to discover that the most dangerous enemies can live inside even the most loyal and loving heart” (Goodreads Synopsis).

“She stands on the cliffs, near the old crumbling stone house” (Tiger Lily, Page 1, Sentence 1).

Krystal’s Review:

Peter Pan you guys…Peter Pan! I’m all about the Peter Pan here recently. It all began when I read Tiger Lily. It then grew exponentially with Ruth B’s new song, “Lost Boy” (which I may be humming along to). Then I went back to read the original Peter Pan story and, to my delight, Tiger Lily is an actual character! My next move is going to watch the newest Peter Pan movie, Pan.

This book was pretty fantastic. I love retellings of fairy tales. One thing that the synopsis does NOT tell you is that the book is told from Tinker Bell’s point-of-view. Tink is amazing (and her grudge against Wendy is explained). Most of the story is told prior to Wendy’s arrival, so it’s almost like you are reading a prequel to the Peter Pan story. This story is about friendship, loyalty, and the power of first love. First loves don’t always last, but the memory of one’s first love is eternal. Tiger Lily and Peter Pan are both great characters, although they each have quite a few character flaws. Tinker Bell, however, was my favorite. Here’s a great quote from Tink: “Sometimes I think that maybe we are just stories. Like we may as well be words on a page, because we’re only what we’ve done and what we are going to do,” (Tiger Lily, pg. 282).

Read the book…you won’t regret it.

Krystal

 

Road to Success

By nchcpl_admin,

Ever wonder what goes on at the Adult Learning Center? Well, that question is better answered by taking a look at a success story from one of our students. We had a student who wanted to get his driver’s license. He only read at a 5th grade level, however, which made it difficult to understand what he needed to know to pass the driver’s test.

After numerous attempts at the test, someone referred him to the Adult Learning Center to get a little help. He came to us and explained his goal to pass the driver’s test, and we matched him with the best tutor for his needs. He and his tutor decided on a schedule that worked for both of them and met for almost two years. During this time, both of them made a commitment to the goal and developed a friendly relationship with one another that they each enjoyed. At the end of their time together, not only was the dedicated student able to pass his driver’s test and get his license, he also improved his life by learning to read at a higher level. With his new reading ability, doors that were closed to him were now open. He had new opportunities to get a better job, go back to school, and enjoy reading as a hobby.

This is just one of many stories here at the Adult Learning Center. One simple goal like earning a driver’s license can lead to all sorts of positive life changes made possible by seeking a little help. If you know of anyone who could benefit from the Adult Learning Center, or if you would like to change lives as a tutor, contact Molly at (765) 575-4551.

Molly Gore is the Adult Learning Center Coordinator. Interested in becoming a tutor or learning a new skill? Contact her at mollyg@nchcpl.lib.in.us or (765) 575-4551. 

Seconds

By nchcpl_admin,

Seconds (1966) is the third and final episode of Frankenheimer’s “Paranoia Trilogy,” a sequence of films that include political thrillers The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and Seven Days in May (1964). The central protagonist is suburbanite Arthur Hamilton (John Randolph), a bank executive who has reached the twilight years of his life with few accomplishments, save for a small monument for past glory in the shape of a dust-collecting tennis trophy in his bedroom. In short, life has become a great big bore for Arthur Hamilton. Soon he is plunged into a whirlpool of the bizarre. Strange phone calls in the dead of night from old friend thought dead, pressing him to contact a shadow organization that can grant Arthur a new lease on life. Reluctantly, Arthur agrees and finds the business through a strange series of back doorways and a ride in the back of a meat-packing truck. After smoothed-talked into signing a contract and paying a large sum of money, Arthur undergoes a painful surgical procedure that completely transforms his appearance. With a new look, name, and job history (the latter involving a phony college degree and a fake career as a painter), Arthur (now “Antiochus Wilson,” played by Rock Hudson) begins his life again on the west coast. But not is all what it seems.

 Seconds was the culmination of a series of noteworthy films John Frankenheimer directed between 1961 and 1966, possibly the peak years of his career. The courtroom drama The Young Savages (1961) tackled gang violence and racial prejudice. All Fall Down (1962) was a counterpoint to the seeming perfection of domestic life depicted in TV sitcoms of the time like Father Knows Best and Leave it to Beaver. Seconds is the dark flipside to the American Dream with an important lesson. It was also ahead of the curve, foreshadowing thrillers in the subsequent decade like The Conversation, The Parallax View, The Stepford Wives, and Capricorn One. Review by staff member Josh D.

Will Krystal’s Hair be Blue?

By nchcpl_admin,

…or pink, red, purple, green, etc.? We have nine days left of Winter Reading for you to turn in all of your review slips and place those marbles in the jar. If the jar gets to the “Fill to Here” line, maybe you will be the lucky person who gets to pick Krystal’s hair color for the next few weeks. Right now the jar is looking rather empty and Krystal’s hair feels safe from crazy hair dyes.

-KrystalMarble Jar 2

New CDs- Winter 2016

By nchcpl_admin,

4 Ways to Celebrate the Love of Learning

By nchcpl_admin,

As everyone knows February 14 is Valentine’s Day, a day that has deep historic roots that go further back than the Middle Ages when the day was celebrated with religious feasts. However, our celebrations now are a lot different than those many years ago. Today, people commonly share cards and candy to celebrate love or friendship with one another instead of attending a feast.

Many of the gifts we are used to seeing in the stores year after year have become cliche in our culture, so why not celebrate your love of learning instead of  giving roses and a box of chocolates this Valentine’s Day?

Here are 4 ways you can celebrate your love of learning this Valentine’s Day:

  1. Spread the word about the Adult Learning Center. Do you have a friend or relative who’s going back to school or who may need help with reading? Let them know about our services. We have tools to help them succeed.
  2. Volunteer to be a tutor. If you have a skill or interest, chances are we have a student who could benefit from your knowledge. You don’t have to have a specific degree or a teaching background, only a desire to help others.
  3. Learn a new skill by becoming a student. Maybe it’s been a few years since you’ve explored a new area of learning. If you have something you’d like to learn, we’d like to help you achieve that goal.
  4. Attend our program “Dropping Back In” Tuesday, March 8, 2016 from 7-8pm in the library’s auditorium. America’s dropout crisis impacts nearly every community. Find out more about this crisis and how it’s affecting Henry County.

Molly Gore is the Adult Learning Center Coordinator. Interested in becoming a tutor or learning a new skill?
Contact her at mollyg@nchcpl.lib.in.us or (765) 529-0362 ext. 1315

 

Lights Out: A Cyber Attack, a Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath

By nchcpl_admin,

From GoodReads: “In this tour de force of investigative reporting, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.”

Judging by the number of books checked out from this library on prepping (preparing for a major disaster), this is a topic of hot interest. Renowned journalist Ted Koppel tells us why this should is an important interest and how much we fall short of being prepared for an attack on our electrical systems. It is evident from this book that many experts disagree on a number of important issues as to whether such a catastrophe could occur on a major level. Many agencies seem to be relying on the resources, plans or capabilities of other agencies.

Everyone agrees that extended damage to the electrical grid would have prolonged and devastating results. Most of our fundamental needs are tied to our electrical resources, water and sanitation being the most crucial. The loss of communication and transportation would soon follow. Koppel discusses a number of survival approaches taken by individuals in rural areas and the extensive efforts of the Mormon Church. He points out, however, how difficult it would be to apply these principles to a city such as New York. Koppel explores the role of government agencies in the area of preventing and managing a disaster.

-Review by Janet T., Reference Librarian